Photo of Mark A. Klapow

The dichotomy between patent and trade secret cases is as old as time. But, Lex Machina’s newest platform – trade secrets – reveals some interesting new insights on key differences between patent and trade secret cases that will matter to plaintiffs and defendants alike. In trade secrets cases, 71% of cases that resolve at trial

The America Invents Act, the Defend Trade Secrets Act, and recent Court decisions demonstrate the ongoing changes affecting intellectual property. The new Trump administration is expected to continue this trend from the legislative perspective, and is expected that Congress will consider further legislation that may rival the size of the America Invents Act. At the

On June 15, Crowell & Moring hosted a trade secrets webinar, “What the New Federal Trade Secrets Law Means for Your Clients.” The panelists, Mark Klapow, Mark Romeo, Mike Songer, and Vince Galluzzo provided an overview Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), signed by President Obama in May. The panelists also discussed how the courts are

In the highest-profile case filed to date under the recently enacted Defend Trade Secrets Act, Space Data has accused Alphabet and Google of misappropriation of trade secrets in the launch of their balloon-based wireless network code named Project Loon, in a complaint filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.

Space

Another court has rejected the broader interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA” or “the Act”) as applying to employees who exceed their authorized use.  A recent decision in Minnesota highlights the issue of whether the Act imposes civil liability on employees who have permission to access their employers’ data, but do so with a wrongful purpose.  See TripleTree, LLC v. Walcker No. 16-609, 2016 WL 2621954 (D. Minn. May 6, 2016).

The court considered this question in the context of a trade secrets case.  A former employee of TripleTree, an investment banking company, was discovered to have accessed the Company’s confidential information and to have engaged in a series of suspicious activities just prior to leaving the Company for a competitor.  Id. at *1.  TripleTree filed claims against its former employee for, among other things, violating the CFAA and the Minnesota Uniform Trade Secrets Act.  Id. at 2. 

The court sua sponte considered whether it should dismiss TripleTree’s CFAA claim.  Id. at *3.  The CFAA sanctions a person who “intentionally accesses a computer without authorization or exceeds authorized access, and thereby obtains  . . . information from a protected computer.”  18 U.S.C. § 1030(a)(2)(c).  Any person who suffers from a violation of the Act may bring a civil claim for damages.  18 U.S.C. § 1030(g).  As an employee of TripleTree, the Defendant was permitted to access the Company’s confidential information.  The court considered whether the Defendant’s malicious intent in accessing the information transformed an otherwise lawful act (using the Company’s computers) into a violation of the CFAA.


Continue Reading

On Tuesday, the Federal Circuit decided, without opinion, not to take another look at the extraterritorial reach of Section 337 trade secret actions. As we reported in an earlier post, the ITC had issued an exclusion order against Chinese firm Sino Legend from importing tire resins based on misappropriated technology. Sino Legend appealed to