Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana bill went into effect in 2016. In order to obtain a permit under that bill, potential medical marijuana grower/processors or dispensaries are required to provide detailed business information with their applications. However, under the state’s Right-to-Know Law (“RTKL”), applicants who can show that information about their security, storage and transportation are trade

Germany recently adopted new legislation governing trade secret protection. The “Gesetz zum Schutz von Geschäftsgeheimnissen” (or Trade Secrets Act) implements European Union Directive 2016/943, which is intended to harmonize trade secrets law across the European Union. While many of the core provisions of the Trade Secrets Act will be familiar to practitioners of U.S. trade

In a recent decision, the Supreme Court of Vermont affirmed its commitment to protecting commercial secrets of private companies, even if they may have been disclosed to a public agency. Long v. City of Burlington, 199 A.3d 542 (Vt. 2018). The Burlington City Council was working with its consultant, ECONorthwest, and private property owners

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Exemption 4 provides that “trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person [that is] privileged or confidential” can be withheld when responding to a FOIA request. But what does this exemption mean? Many district courts and circuit courts have ruled on this issue but the rulings

On November 2, 2017, Foltz Welding LTD filed a motion for preliminary injunction against its former employee and operations manager in the United Stated District Court Southern District of Illinois. The company filed a nine-count complaint against its former employee and requested injunctive relief and damages. Foltz Welding claimed that the former employee may have

Fera Pharmaceuticals LLC, Akorn Inc., and Perrigo Co. PLC have settled a $100 million trade secrets case three weeks before trial was set to begin in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.  The case primarily involved trade secrets related to the production of erythromycin.  In its lawsuit filed in 2012,

Last week, government contractor Advanced Fluid Systems Inc. wrapped up its summary judgment briefing in a case loaded with trade secrets trends.  In June, Advanced sought summary judgment in the Middle District of Pennsylvania on its claims for misappropriation of trade secrets, and aiding and abetting breach of fiduciary duty.  Advanced had sued a former

On July 5, 2016, the Ninth Circuit affirmed the conviction of David Nosal, an ex-employee of Korn/Ferry, an executive search firm, who left to start a competing firm. With Nosal’s knowledge and encouragement, two other former employees of Korn/Ferry used a current employee’s credentials to gain access to the Korn/Ferry database and take confidential information. U.S. v. Nosal, No. 14-10037, 2016 WL 3608752 at 6 (9th Cir. July 5, 2016).

The prosecutors charged Nosal with violating section 1030 (a)(4) of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”), which criminalizes “knowingly and with intent to defraud, access[ing] a protected computer without authorization, or exceed[ing]authorized access, and by means of such conduct further[ing] the intended fraud and obtain[ing] anything of value.”1 Having failed to state an offense that Nosal “exceeded authorized access” by violating the company’s internal use restrictions (decided in Nosal I), the government filed a superseding indictment alleging Nosal violated the “without authorization” prong of the CFAA after his login credentials were revoked through his co-conspirators’ use of his former executive assistant’s login information to access Korn/Ferry’s database.

The jury convicted Nosal on all counts. On appeal, the Ninth Circuit analyzed the meaning of the words “without authorization.” The Court held that the phrase was unambiguous and its plain meaning encompassed the situation in this case where the employer rescinded permission to access a computer and the defendant accessed the computer anyway.


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A federal civil cause of action for trade secrets misappropriation appears to be quickly becoming reality. Following the lead of the Senate, on Wednesday, April 20, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee approved the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2015, S. 1890, without amendment. The bipartisan bill will now head to the full House of