The dichotomy between patent and trade secret cases is as old as time. But, Lex Machina’s newest platform – trade secrets – reveals some interesting new insights on key differences between patent and trade secret cases that will matter to plaintiffs and defendants alike. In trade secrets cases, 71% of cases that resolve at trial are won by claimants whereas 29% are won by claim defendants. LexMachina Article. By contrast, in patent cases filed between 2000 to 2018, 7% were won by the claimant whereas 4% were won by the defendant while 68% of those cases resulted in a likely settlement and 14% resolved on a procedural resolution. This stark contrast in outcomes when comparing the different types of intellectual property is useful to clients who are assessing how best to protect these valuable resources. Lex Machina offers evidence about the success of different types of remedies in trade secret cases, revealing 51% of cases granted a temporary restraining order (“TRO”), 86% of cases granted a Permanent Injunction, and 63% of cases denied a Preliminary Injunction which can be further refined by jurisdiction to provide useful intel on case strategy when bringing these cases. Lex Machina also offers empirical data on the outcome of patent litigation, notably the relative proportion of infringement versus no infringement findings at trial. With this data, attorneys can make more informed strategic decisions for their clients for both patent and trade secret cases.

Just last week, Lex Machina introduced its newest module which will cover trade secrets litigation – one of the most requested additions to this valuable analytical platform.

Lex Machina is an important tool for all trade secret litigators, drawing from nearly 10,000 trade secret cases in federal court since 2009 to provide in-depth strategic insights on cases with allegations ranging from state trade secret misappropriation to Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”) violations.

Lex Machina offers analytical data on key aspects of trade secret cases, including the size of damages awards in a given jurisdiction to the likelihood of securing a preliminary injunction to the most common law firms representing plaintiffs in trade secret cases. Lex Machina can be used to both track trends in trade secret cases over time and drill into specific cases and download copies of relevant pleadings or motions.

Lex Machina also can be a valuable tool both to advise clients who are interested in how long it takes to resolve a trade secrets case either on dispositive motions or at trial and develop a solid legal strategy on issues like whether to file in a certain jurisdiction based on a judge’s track record with trade secrets cases.

For anyone practicing in the trade secrets space who wants a leg up on the latest trends and authoritative insights backed by data, Lex Machina could be a game changer and won’t remain secret for long.